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Wednesday, October 2

  1. page home edited Tweet #iuppomopo Otherstream American Poetry

    Tweet #iuppomopo
    Otherstream American Poetry
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    6:30 am

Tuesday, June 11

  1. page Sample transcription of Creeley Reading After Lorca edited ... </body> </text> Audio Reading at San Francisco State, 1956 from Pennsound Te…
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    </body>
    </text>
    Audio
    Reading at San Francisco State, 1956 from Pennsound

    Text with Paralinguistic Features Noted
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    9:22 am
  2. page Sample transcription of Creeley Reading After Lorca edited ... After Lorca</head> <u who="#poet"> <shift feature="tempo"…
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    After Lorca</head>
    <u who="#poet">
    <shift feature="tempo" new="allegro">new="allegro"/>
    <lg type="stanza">
    <l>The church is a business, and the rich</l>
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    <l>When they pull on the bells, the</l>
    <l>poor come piling in and when a poor man dies, he has a wooden </l>
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    <shift feature="loud" new="f">new="f"/> rush through <shift feature="loud" />new="normal"/> the ceremony.</l>
    </lg>
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    9:21 am

Monday, June 10

  1. page Sample transcription of Creeley Reading After Lorca edited ... <l>When they pull on the bells, the</l> <l>poor come piling in and when a p…
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    <l>When they pull on the bells, the</l>
    <l>poor come piling in and when a poor man dies, he has a wooden </l>
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    <shift feature="loud" new="f"/>new="f"> rush through
    </lg>
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    10:15 am

Saturday, May 25

  1. page Web entries on poets edited ... As far as Snyder’s poetry is concerned, his poem “As for Poets” imbues lucid style, flexible a…
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    As far as Snyder’s poetry is concerned, his poem “As for Poets” imbues lucid style, flexible and accessible diction with deep visions of ecology per se. Apart from the thematic frame of this poem, it has a unique idiosyncratic tone and structure that match the groundbreaking motif addressed before our eyes. As the poem reads: “The first/ Water Poet/ Stayed down six years./ He was covered with seaweed./ The life in his poem/ Left millions of tiny/different tracks.” For Snyder, the poem addresses the ways in which the poet should keep his poem alive through communicating nature with respect and reverence. The brevity of Snyder’s style aligns with the cadence and poetic frame used. Wrestling with new experimental tools, Snyder calls for a very profound relation with nature. Therefore, Snyder views nature as an eternal source of originality and organic balance between the poet and nature. Such poetic belief draws heavily on the hidden and explicit energy and [[#|power]] that a human being can gain from nature.
    Meditative poetry, as stressed by Snyder, juxtaposes the musical breath of the poem with the thematic frame of it. The poetic meditation helps the poet strengthen his images and rhetoric. As Buddhism is a way of philosophy and life rather than a religious doctrine, Snyder penetrates the realms of ecology or the primitive for “nature knows best.” As if the most reiterated question posed by Snyder’s poetry is: What would poetry be without deep ecology? Ecology, in other words, connotes a poetic of harmony and egalitarianism. Through understanding the genuine relation between nature and self, he/she would absorb well how the cosmic system operates and functions. To humanize nature, as Snyder stresses, means to leave room for a third space when it comes to man-nature relation. As he puts it: “ The Air Poets/ Play out the swiftest gales/ And sometimes loll in the eddies/ …Fire Poets burn at absolute zero/ Fossil love pumped back up” ( Paul Hoover 1994, 118-119). Linking the poet’s very stance with nature sounds one of the dominant premises addressed in this poem. Snyder’s poetic style is pretty loaded with deep images, experimental devices and elegant cadence that often resonate the ecological depth and its implications within poetry.
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    ibid, 219).
    Works Cited
    Hoover, Paul. Postmodern American Poetry. New York: Norton and Company, Inc., 1994. Print.
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    2:56 pm
  2. page Web entries on poets edited ... Web Entry Gary Snyder and Ecopiety ... source of power [[#|power]] , natural ... Snyde…
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    Web Entry
    Gary Snyder and Ecopiety
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    source of power[[#|power]] , natural
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    Snyder, should entailhold a very
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    with nature. With that in mind,Therefore, Snyder views
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    poem with the thematic frame
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    that often resonatesresonate the ecological
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    shortened form. With thatDedicated to such poetic style in mind,oeuvre , Snyder calls
    Works Cited
    Hoover, Paul. Postmodern American Poetry. New York: Norton and Company, Inc., 1994. Print.
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    2:55 pm

Thursday, May 9

  1. page Adam Norwood web entry on Amiri Baraka edited ... A well known African-American writer of fiction, drama, poetry, and music, Amiri Baraka has re…
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    A well known African-American writer of fiction, drama, poetry, and music, Amiri Baraka has received the PEN Open Book Award for such books as Tales of the Out and the Gone and established himself as one of the most preeminent antiestablishment writers of his generation. Aside from writing, Baraka has been described as a revolutionary political activist who has written articles and lectured widely throughout the world. Born as LeRoi Jones in 1934 Newark, New Jersey, Baraka studied at Rutgers and then Howard University before going on to Colombia University where he majored in philosophy and religion. Joining the US Air Force in 1954, Baraka rose to the rank of sergeant before being dishonorably discharged under suspicion of communist sympathies.
    Following his return to civil life, Baraka discovered jazz music and began to write poetry under the influence of John Coltrane, Malcolm X, Ornette Coleman, and Thelonius Monk. Baraka founded Totem Press in 1958 which published such poetry icons as Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg in the literary magazine Yugen. It was through this publications as well as his work as an editor of Kulcher and Floating Bear (in partnership with Diane DiPrima) that Baraka began his various associations with the Black Mountain Poets, the New York School Poets, and the Beat Poets. A collection of essays entitled "The Essence of Reparations" and radical poems in Preface to a Twenty Volume Suicide Note earned Baraka his first true critical acclaim. More success followed with his volume jazz criticism, Blues People: Negro Music in White America (1963), and his controversial Obie Award-winning play, Dutchman (1964).
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    a Marxist.
    Baraka's

    Baraka's
    work has
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    an artwork.
    (view changes)
    2:01 pm
  2. page Adam Norwood web entry on Amiri Baraka edited Amiri Baraka A well known African-American writer of fiction, drama, poetry, and music, Amiri Bar…
    Amiri Baraka
    A well known African-American writer of fiction, drama, poetry, and music, Amiri Baraka has received the PEN Open Book Award for such books as Tales of the Out and the Gone and established himself as one of the most preeminent antiestablishment writers of his generation. Aside from writing, Baraka has been described as a revolutionary political activist who has written articles and lectured widely throughout the world. Born as LeRoi Jones in 1934 Newark, New Jersey, Baraka studied at Rutgers and then Howard University before going on to Colombia University where he majored in philosophy and religion. Joining the US Air Force in 1954, Baraka rose to the rank of sergeant before being dishonorably discharged under suspicion of communist sympathies.
    Following his return to civil life, Baraka discovered jazz music and began to write poetry under the influence of John Coltrane, Malcolm X, Ornette Coleman, and Thelonius Monk. Baraka founded Totem Press in 1958 which published such poetry icons as Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg in the literary magazine Yugen. It was through this publications as well as his work as an editor of Kulcher and Floating Bear (in partnership with Diane DiPrima) that Baraka began his various associations with the Black Mountain Poets, the New York School Poets, and the Beat Poets. A collection of essays entitled "The Essence of Reparations" and radical poems in Preface to a Twenty Volume Suicide Note earned Baraka his first true critical acclaim. More success followed with his volume jazz criticism, Blues People: Negro Music in White America (1963), and his controversial Obie Award-winning play, Dutchman (1964).
    As Baraka moved into his black nationalist phase, his poem "Black Art" (1965) became a rallying cry to everyone seeking armed struggle against the white power structure. Adopting the Muslim name Imamu Amear Baraka in 1967, the poet later simplified this moniker to Amiri Baraka. Much of his work from the 1960s onward focuses on the black experience in America and the post-colonial legacies of other former slave-holding nations. Many of his poems combine this meditation on racial inequity with a social class lens to create an emotive performance not unlike a sermon in its tone and rhythm, although Baraka's use of colloquial obscenity and aggressive word play create a poetic experience designed to establish an ideological positions which all but dares the audience to resist. By the mid-70s, Baraka was distancing himself from black nationalism and was opening referring to himself as simply a Marxist.
    Baraka's work has drawn criticism at times due to the themes of rape and violence that are sometimes directed against women, gay people, white people, and Jews. While such critics have cited Baraka's earlier work as being rife with subtle forms of racism, sexism, homophobia, and antisemitism, others have described the works as coming forth from vernacular expressions of Black oppression. Baraka himself has since described that writing as born from the anger of a bystander to so many political assassinations including John Kennedy, Patrice Lumumba, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, and Robert Kennedy. These controversies were again stoked in 2001 when Baraka composed the radical poem "Somebody Blewup America" which suggests an American-Israeli conspiracy of fore-knowledge regarding the attacks on 09/11. Despite such controversy, or perhaps because of it, Baraka's poetry continues to tantalize readers with everyday speech framed around the black/white culture divide and proves that, at least for Baraka, political considerations can never be truly removed from the content of an artwork.

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    2:01 pm
  3. page Web entries on poets edited ... Bryan's Web entry on Denise Levertov, Illustrious Ancestors Mais Al-Shara'h (Web Entry) Ada…
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    Bryan's Web entry on Denise Levertov, Illustrious Ancestors
    Mais Al-Shara'h (Web Entry)
    Adam Norwood web entry on Amiri Baraka
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    1:59 pm
  4. page Web entries on poets edited ... Web Entry Gary Snyder and Ecopiety ... source of [[#|power]] power , natural ... energ…
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    Web Entry
    Gary Snyder and Ecopiety
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    source of [[#|power]]power , natural
    ...
    energy and power[[#|power]] that a
    Meditative poetry, as stressed by Snyder, juxtaposes the musical breath of the poem with thematic frame of it. The poetic meditation helps the poet strengthen his images and rhetoric. As Buddhism is a way of philosophy and life rather than a religious doctrine, Snyder penetrates the realms of ecology or the primitive for “nature knows best.” As if the most reiterated question posed by Snyder’s poetry is: What would poetry be without deep ecology? Ecology, in other words, connotes a poetic of harmony and egalitarianism. Through understanding the genuine relation between nature and self, he/she would absorb well how the cosmic system operates and functions. To humanize nature, as Snyder stresses, means to leave room for a third space when it comes to man-nature relation. As he puts it: “ The Air Poets/ Play out the swiftest gales/ And sometimes loll in the eddies/ …Fire Poets burn at absolute zero/ Fossil love pumped back up” ( Paul Hoover 1994, 118-119). Linking the poet’s very stance with nature sounds one of the dominant premises addressed in this poem. Snyder’s poetic style is pretty loaded with deep images, experimental devices and elegant cadence that often resonates the ecological depth and its implications within poetry.
    The visual images created in Snyder’s poetry stem from his resourceful background of ecology and multiculturalism. Snyder’s poem, for instance, “As for Poets” delves into the infinite realms of ecopiety through creating splendid and unexpected visual image originated from deep ecology. Such images are ostensibly bound to a carefree tone which very often requires a shortened form. With that poetic style in mind, Snyder calls for paying enough attention to the ‘ silent melody’ of ecology and the human soul as well. Such poetic device would urge the reader to interact with the emotive depth of the poem and its superb musicality. As his poem highlights this sense of ‘silent melody,’ he says “The first/ Water Poet / Stayed down six years/ He was covered with seaweed./ The life in his poem / Left millions of tiny/Different tracks/ Criss-crossing through the mud” ( ibid, 219). Interestingly, Snyder, I believe, adheres to such powerful style in order to explore the deeply-rooted relation between poetry and nature not in the conventional romantic way, but through exploring the innermost possibilities of musicality and ecopiety. Poetry, as orchestrated by Snyder, lends itself to “millions of tiny Different tracks,” not prescribed ones. The sky, for Snyder, is the poem where the galaxy of deep images, musical and visual patterns meet and collide as he puts it strikingly: “ The poem / Is seen from all sides,/ Everywhere,/ At once.” ( ibid, 219).
    (view changes)
    12:09 pm

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